Search This Blog

Monday, June 17, 2013

Not your usual Fathers Day

I was not able to get home to see my Father yesterday. They were without power for a couple of days but the gift he gave me instead of I giving him one was profound.

I had a scheduled Concealed Carry Handgun Class yesterday. I had twelve students. These classes are always scheduled for the third weekend of the month. Happenstance meant this class ran on Fathers Day. I called him as soon as I got home from class. He wanted to know how many students and how the class went first and foremost. We talked about all the Handguns I observed in class. He seems to enjoy that greatly as do I. 

So on the day I am supposed to pay honor to him I am channeling the gifts he gave me so long ago about running a Firearm.  

It used to be a right of passage of manhood to transition from a BB gun to a .22, to a .410 shotgun, to a rifle in this Country under the watchful eye and tutelage of your Father. 

Observing my classes not so much anymore.  I have come to the conclusion as I this week will turn another year older on the wrong side of 50, if people show up in class, I will try to instill everything I have learned from so long ago merged with things I continue to learn about running a Firearm to them.

I'm trying to get him a special gift from the Blue Dome in Connecticut. It's difficult though. 

Thanks Pop!  


 
















Oh, this is a Smith and Wesson .32 long revolver. It is as old as I am. Love the little thing!

14 comments:

  1. I wish my dad were still around, to see his granddaughters at the range.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed Sir. I know I have limited time with him, but the things he taught me and continues to is timeless.

      Granddaughters. That is awesome! So I'm not the only one paying it forward. That helps assuage my mind.

      Delete
  2. I was thinking Saturday how much I miss not only Dad, but all his siblings and family, with all their craziness. And a friend commented about "getting over" losing someone. No, I said. You adapt and go on because that is what we do to survive, but the loss is always there.

    Dad didn't shoot much after we left the Settlement. But I like to think my interest is carrying on his mountain heritage and that he and his father and his father's father and on back for centuries would be pleased as they watch me, my daughter, and, when it's time, my granddaughter learn the skills that were essential to their survival on the frontier.

    ReplyDelete
  3. You're how old? "Practice talking like this, you should. Mmmmmm...."

    ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't make me come up there! Oh wait.........

      Delete
  4. The first "real" firearm I ever fired after I'd transitioned out of the BB gun stage was Dad's old, rattley, M1911.

    I was lucky I could anything past 10 yards with it!

    Now I can clang steel at 50 yards with my Kimber 1911, and I'm sure that would rate a smile from him were he still with us.

    And he'd probably grin really wide if he saw my son and I doing it at the range together.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure of it drjim. Aren't all 1911's rattley ? Ducks =)

      Delete
  5. It was my Mom that taught me to shoot, not my Dad (she was the Sheriff) but Dad was always supportie of anything that would help us learn and grow.

    I know your Dad understands these gifts, which is why they were passed on.

    Give my best to him, on this, or any other day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you B.! I most certainly will.

      Delete
  6. Nice, and while you may not have gotten home, i'm sure he's proud of you for what you're doing to help others protect themselves!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure he is NFO. I will run up there this weekend. Maybe we will have time to shoot!

      Delete
  7. I hope you do have time to shoot with your dad this weekend. My dad used to bring me bow shooting every Sunday when I was kid.

    ReplyDelete